How should a gardener feel about the first Fall frost?

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I woke up this morning to our first Fall frost. It’s fine. It’s ok. I expected it, of course. I’m not going to get worked up about frost on garden plants.

But, it stayed on my mind.

As the kids were getting ready for school, I walked through the chaos thinking about the tiny, frosty icicles dragging down the sage leaves and smothering the nasturtiums. Doesn’t everyone?

I made my tea and walked the kids down to the bus stop. The steam was beautiful in the chilly morning air.

The kids noticed the frost. To them, it was an opportunity, not an obstacle. My son immediately jumped the fence and began to track paths through the frosty fields. My daughter climbed up on the railings and shouted directions to him. Two little frost artists. I captured some moments in photos.

Boy walking through a frosty New England field

Then, I got the idea to capture photos of the first garden frost to reframe my perspective. Frost brings a new and fleeting beauty to the garden. I’ll never forget my three-year old daughter waking up one morning, seeing frost on her windows and shouting, “the princess was here!”

The root veggies – beets, salsify, parsnip, carrots – they taste a little sweeter after a frost. You can’t get that wonderful change in flavor without losing the more vulnerable eggplants, basil and tomatoes to the chill.

Take a minute to view some of the frosty scenes from my garden this morning. It was beautiful. Then, the sun rose a little higher, and it was gone.

Beautiful, frosty garden tour

Carrots like a little frost
Carrots like a little bit of frost
Violas can handle the frost
Violas can handle some frost
Morning frost on strawberry buds
Season’s over for these strawberry buds

 

Frosty lavender turns silver
Frosty lavender turns silver
Frost overcomes a purple eggplant blossom
Frost overcomes a purple eggplant blossom
Clary sage plant in frost
Clary sage covered in frost

You may remember the clary sage from the forgotten herbs series. It looked a little different without its frosty blanket.

Blueberry plants vivid red in autumn with frost
Blueberry plants turn vivid red under the first Fall frost 
Calendula plant with frost in the morning sun
Calendula through the frost and morning sun

My third crop of calendula won’t survive the cool weather. It was featured earlier this year as one of my favorite forgotten herbs.

Frost on thyme leaves and lemon balm
Frost on the edges of thyme
garden cloche bell covered in frost
Sure, now I remember the garden cloche
last rose of summer covered in frost
Last rose of summer tinged with frost

Thank you for viewing my garden during our first Fall frost of the year.

You can see more forgotten herbs in the on-going series.

 

11 thoughts on “How should a gardener feel about the first Fall frost?

    1. Thank you, Brigid, I am enjoying your blog and pictures of your garden, too! It so makes me want to find time to read more. I wish I could do 50-70 books a year, impressive!

  1. I can’t get over how beautiful these photos (and your garden) are! Absolutely stunning. I’ve never followed someone on Instagram so fast! hahaha

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